The Adventure Collective

Local. Outdoor. Adventure.

Kayak Fish The Harbor (Charleston)

Kayak Fish the Harbor (James Island): The grassy marshland that lines the West Ashley and James Island side of Charleston harbor is rife with sea trout and red fish. A kayak’s silence and stealth allows anglers a closer approach to their prey than in a motorized craft. Focus on the mouths of small feeder creeks opening up into the harbor, or just troll an electric chicken lure behind your kayak and paddle along the grass line against the current....

Surf Fish Morris Island (Charleston)

Surf Angling the Morris Island Lighthouse (Folly Beach): Set up shop for a day of casting into the surf right where Folly turns toward Morris Island and its iconic lighthouse rises from the waves. Fish shrimp on a popping cork or let a bottom rig sit with shrimp or mullet. Redfish and flounder are frequently caught here (as are small sharks and rays — have your pliers handy). It’s also one of the better places to try saltwater fly...

Ride Ravenal Bridge (Charleston)

Cross the Largest Cable-Stay Bridge in the U.S. (Downtown Charleston): Forget the horse-drawn carriages: Charleston is best viewed by bicycle. Park at the Visitors’ Center on Meeting St., then head over to King St. and pedal north 1 mile to Huger St. Turn left, then turn right on Ashley Ave. Circumnavigate Hampton Park before turning into the Citadel, Charleston’s...

James Island Dog Park (Charleston)

James Island County Park Dog Park (James Island): With its sandy beach, swimming lake, and multi-acre field surrounded by woods, James Island boasts the Taj Majal of dog parks. The park provides drinking water, hoses for cleaning and cooling off, entry and exit gates, and bags and collection cans for your pooch’s poo. Directions from Charleston: Take Hwy 17 S and bear left after the Ashley River Bridge toward Folly Beach. Pass EarthFare on your right, cross another bridge,...

Explore Fort Moultrie (Charleston)

Explore Fort Moultrie (Sullivan’s Island): Fort Moultrie’s legacy lives forever on the S.C. state flag—the fort’s palmetto log sides famously absorbed a barrage of British cannonballs during the Revolutionary War. Today it’s a fine place to take your four-legged friend. Dogs aren’t allowed inside the fort itself, but when leashed they’re welcome to play in the surrounding fields, which...

Kiawah Beachwalker Park (Charleston)

Kiawah Beachwalker Park (Kiawah Island): Among Charleston’s beaches, Kiawah’s Beachwalker County Park has the least restrictive dog rules. They’re allowed year-round, all day long, as long as they’re leashed. It’s also one of the Lowcountry’s most beautiful and fragile beaches. Walk to the end of Capt. Sam’s Spit for a panoramic view of the Kiawah River, the Atlantic Ocean,...

Paddle The First Canal (Charleston)

Paddle America’s First Canal (Moncks Corner): Old Santee Canal Park boasts an impressive museum, visitor center and a boardwalk through the swampy area along the Cooper River. They also maintain the Santee Canal, built in the late 18th century to transport crops between the uplands and Charleston. Today, the canal is a fine place to explore and escape into nature. The park rents canoes for $3 per half hour, and you’re welcome to bring your own. Leashed dogs are...

Ride Raccoon Mountain (Chattanooga)

Small Intestine Loop (Raccoon Mountain, Mountain Bike): Features over 17.5 miles of single-track filled with beautiful views of the Tennessee River Gorge and Chattanooga. Trails range from easy to advanced and offer everything from fun rolling terrain to serious rock gardens that will challenge the most seasoned rider. For a must ride trail, check out the Small Intestine Loop. Local’s Picks: Raccoon Mountain Trails – Ronnie Driver, River City Bikes Pick: Raccoon Mountain Trails I like riding Raccoon Mountain,...

Explore Laurel-Snow Wilderness (Chattanooga)

Laurel-Snow Pocket Wilderness (Cumberland Trail, Dayton): Laurel-Snow is a 2,259-acre natural area located on the eastern escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau, just north of Dayton. The trail, named for its two scenic waterfalls, includes three scenic overlooks as well as creeks, steep gorges, a small stand of virgin timber and spring wildflowers. After 1.5 miles of hiking into the natural area beside Richland Creek, the trail forks. Follow the trail to the left to reach Snow Falls (35 ft.);...

Signal Point Trail (Chattanooga)

Signal Point Trail (Cumberland Trail, Prentice Cooper State Forest): A must do hike in Chattanooga filled with scenic overlooks, waterfalls, swinging bridges, and water side campsites! A short hike from the parking lot, hikers are greeted with an overlook of the Tennessee River Gorge and downtown Chattanooga. A couple of miles further, and hikers will encounter Rainbow Falls on...